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G4Games » Gadgets » K1 Powered NVIDIA Tegra Note Tablet Prototype Surfaces In Benchmark, Shows Its Next Gen Teeth

K1 Powered NVIDIA Tegra Note Tablet Prototype Surfaces In Benchmark, Shows Its Next Gen Teeth

by Mihai Matei on February 17, 2014


Earlier this year, NVIDIA shed more light on its next-gen mobile processor – the K1. The chip promises a ton of interesting characteristics, including 192 GPU cores with CUDA technology. This makes the K1 sound like a beast, and NVIDIA claims that the chip itself can outperform the one found on the Xbox 360 or a PS3, while being significantly more power efficient at the same time.

In any case, the K1 chip is still some time away from its arrival on consumer electronics products, and everyone is eager to see whether or not the SoC will deliver on NVIDIA’s claims.

The good news is that, earlier today, a Tegra Note tablet prototype has been spotted in AnTuTu, and by the looks of it, the K1 can really hold its own. Check it out below.

K1 Powered NVIDIA Tegra Note Tablet Prototype Surfaces In Benchmark, Shows Its Next Gen Teeth

K1 Powered NVIDIA Tegra Note Tablet Prototype Surfaces In Benchmark, Shows Its Next Gen Teeth

K1-Powered NVIDIA Tegra Tablet Hits the Benchmarks

So there you have it people: check out the “Tegra Note P1761“. Based on the information gathered from AnTuTu, the device packs 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB of ROM, and runs on Android 4.4.2. More importantly, a 4+1-core Tegra K1 accompanied by Kepler graphics makes everything tick.

Performance-wise, the P1761 sits comfortably in between the original Tegra Note (P1640) powered by a Tegra 4 processor, and the K1 tablet prototype that has been showcased during the original unveiling event.

K1 Powered NVIDIA Tegra Note Tablet Prototype Surfaces In Benchmark, Shows Its Next Gen Teeth

You might be a bit disappointed to see that the Tegra Note P1761 isn’t scoring as much as the prototype that has been showcased about a month ago, but don’t rush to any conclusions yet. This fresh Tegra Note tablet is definitely a “work in progress”, and the CPU even runs at a lower frequency than it should (2.1 GHz, instead of 2.3 GHz).


You should also keep in mind that the demo unit has been designed specifically for showcasing the SoC’s graphical capabilities, but that particular K1 will never be commercialized. This, however (the unit powering the P1761) will hit the shelves, and chances are that the performance graph above isn’t showcasing the chip’s true power. You can be certain that the final product will be able to deliver higher scores than what you see above. Not to mention the fact that other hardware components could change as well, including the amount of RAM.

In any case, that’s pretty much it for now, but stick around and we’ll discuss more about the mysterious Tegra Note P1761 once the story develops further.

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